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New Publication! “Loss of E-cadherin Enhances IGF1–IGF1R Pathway Activation and Sensitizes Breast Cancers to Anti-IGF1R/InsR Inhibitors”

Loss of E-cadherin Enhances IGF1–IGF1R Pathway Activation and Sensitizes Breast Cancers to Anti-IGF1R/InsR Inhibitors

We provide evidence that loss of E-cadherin hyperactivates the IGF1R pathway and increases sensitivity to IGF1R/InsR targeted therapy, thus identifying the IGF1R pathway as a potential novel target in E-cadherin–deficient breast cancers such as invasive lobular cancer.

Drs. Adrian Lee and Steffi Oesterreich received the 2018 PNC Elsie Hillman Distinguished Scholar Award!

Congratulations to Drs. Adrian Lee and Steffi Oesterreich on receiving the 2018 PNC Elsie Hillman Distinguished Scholar Award.  The award was announced at this year’s UPMC Hillman Gala that took place on Thursday, September 20 at PPG Paints Arena. Drs. Lee and Oesterreich were joined on that special evening by their daughters Paula and Nicola Lee-Oesterreich (photo below). You can read further coverage at the Pittsburgh-Post Gazette.

Photos from the gala:

Adrian and Steffi with Lou Cestello, Regional President, PNC
With Paula and Nicola Lee-Oesterreich
The award!

  

 

New publication! “Key regulators of lipid metabolism drive endocrine resistance in invasive lobular breast cancer”

Our latest paper focused on lobular breast cancer is now available. Role for SREBP1 and other regulators of fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis in invasive lobular breast cancer.

New publication! “Circulating Tumor Cell Phenotyping via High-Throughput Acoustic Separation.”

 2018 Aug;14(32):e1801131. doi: 10.1002/smll.201801131. Epub 2018 Jul 3.

Circulating Tumor Cell Phenotyping via High-Throughput Acoustic Separation.

Abstract

The study of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) offers pathways to develop new diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers that benefit cancer treatments. In order to fully exploit and interpret the information provided by CTCs, the development of a platform is reported that integrates acoustics and microfluidics to isolate rare CTCs from peripheral blood in high throughput while preserving their structural, biological, and functional integrity. Cancer cells are first isolated from leukocytes with a throughput of 7.5 mL h-1 , achieving a recovery rate of at least 86% while maintaining the cells’ ability to proliferate. High-throughput acoustic separation enables statistical analysis of isolated CTCs from prostate cancer patients to be performed to determine their size distribution and phenotypic heterogeneity for a range of biomarkers, including the visualization of CTCs with a loss of expression for the prostate specific membrane antigen. The method also enables the isolation of even rarer, but clinically important, CTC clusters.